Schedule Shaming

I follow Courtney Carver’s blog, Be More With Less, and she coined a name for a dynamic that’s been a problem for me my whole life.

Photo by Anna Dziubinska on Unsplash

She calls it schedule shaming, and it describes “measuring who we are by what we accomplish.” Accomplish in the sense of produce. In other words, being mean to ourselves at the end of the day because we didn’t “do” enough.

I’ve known for several years that this is a problem for me, but I haven’t had a way to change it until I read Courtney’s post. The remedy is so simple I’m embarrassed I didn’t come up with it myself. I’m usually good at this sort of thing.

Instead of listening to that internal voice about what we should have done and didn’t do, and what a lazy, worthless, waste of space we are, she suggests applying a new set of questions, a better set of questions, to determine our value.

A list! I like lists! I took the idea and ran with it:

  • What were my feelings today? (Feelings are single words like mad, glad, sad, scared and ashamed, and we can experience any combination and number of them.)
  • How did I treat myself today?
  • How did I treat others today?
  • Who did I love today? (Don’t forget self-love.)
  • Did I laugh today?
  • Did I feel and/or express gratitude today?
  • Was I authentic today?
  • What did I learn today?
  • Did I spend time outside today?
  • Was I more creative than destructive today?
  • Did I live deep today?

After reading Courtney’s post, making my list, and making notes for this post, I put all my focus on these replacement questions every time I started hearing that internal critic tell me I was a useless and didn’t deserve to take up space.

Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

I immediately noticed two things, and those things have remained unchanged every day since then.

  1. I am a much nicer person when I don’t judge my worth by production.
  2. I accomplish far more, with less resistance and more joy, than I did before.

I feel like a dumbass on a couple of levels. First, I know very well (who doesn’t?) that a carrot always works better than a stick. Nobody has ever been able to beat me into submission, including myself. Love and connection motivate me far more than any kind of force or coercion. As for disapproval – spare me. I don’t give a damn about winning anyone’s approval. People have been disapproving of me my whole life no matter what I do. I’m used to it.

Second, I’ve struggled with schedule shaming forever, and when I say struggle, I mean self-loathing, self-harm, financial dysfunction, compulsion, speeding, and mental health challenges like anxiety and depression. And all those years it was this easy to fix. All I needed to do was put being before doing and give myself permission and recognition for the person I naturally and honestly am.

Photo by Biel Morro on Unsplash

The coronavirus has cast a harsh light onto the balance between being, doing, and having. I think about this kind of thing all the time anyway, but the shutdowns, furloughs, and limitations to our ability to live normally have made many people who were too busy and driven to notice such things newly aware. Interestingly, present circumstances have impacted our doing and having much more than our being. Being goes on, sick or well, rich or poor, working or not working, masked or unmasked. Being is what truly defines us, in spite of our attachment to things, activities, and identities. Without being, we’re just empty shells, and we really are wasting our lives, no matter what we accomplish or have.

Today I laughed until I ached at our kitten, Ozzy, who falls asleep on his feet and spends minutes with eyes tight shut, swaying and slumping, before he finally gives up and lies down. That’s what I remember about my day. I cleaned the kitchen, did a load of laundry, wrote, and dealt with the green caterpillars eating my growing dill, too, but none of that was as sweet, as real, or as important as laughing at Oz and the love and gratitude I feel for this small creature.

What a well-lived day.

My daily crime.

Photo by Bill Williams on Unsplash

© 2020, Jenny Rose. All rights reserved.

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